How to make a Brazilian Feijoada

The story goes that the Portuguese farm owners would keep the best parts of pork for themselves and send the offcuts to the slave house to be added to a large vat of black beans… and voilá, Brazil’s national dish was creaed – The Feijoada. Reality may have been a bit different.

The story goes that the Portuguese farm owners would keep the best parts of pork for themselves and send the offcuts to the slave house to be added to a large vat of black beans… and voilá, Brazil’s national dish was creaed – The Feijoada. Reality may have been a bit different.

The dish was quite popular back in Portugal even before it made its way to Brazil and the Portuguese were well known for not wasting any peaces of a pig. In fact, offcuts like trotters, ears, tails or even snout, were treasured delicacies. So it’s unlikely the slaves had anything other than bones and a bit of cassava flower added to their diets.

Feijoada is not only a good wholesome dish, but it’s also ideal to serve on large parties. It’s delicious and filling, relatively cheap, as it’s all prepared in one big pot and boiled over a number of hours, you can have it ready ages before the party. In fact, depending on the space in your fridge, you can prepare your feijoada the day before. This will leave more time for you to prepare the other treasures of Brazilian cooking which are usually served with a feijoada: Farofa, re-fried rice, fried greens (Couve) and some refreshing slices of fresh orange.

And don’t forget the liquid accompaniment. Although light beers (Brazilians drink Chop – a light lager) are ideal to refresh the palate, a proper true Brazilian Caipirinha is required to make this an authentic Brazilian experience.

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7 Responses to "How to make a Brazilian Feijoada"

  1. First Magazine® // Food, Travel & Leisure // How to make a Brazilian Feijoada - Cuca Brazuca says:

    [...] video recipe is taken from a Brazilian food site we found, CucaBrazuca.com, part of a growing community in London. Cuca also links to a few other Brazilian food [...]

  2. Agda says:

    No nordeste, sem querer cair no terror da generalização, o feijão preferido é o mulatinho. A feijoada de domingo é marronzinha. Eu sempre fico a imaginar, o que historicamente determinou essa preferência.

  3. Marcelo says:

    I saw the video but can’t find the recipe…

  4. Terry says:

    No offence, but the people in Minas would scoff at the Rio style of feijoada. They put the meat (pork only), beans, water, seasoning in the pot together. Not all the meat; some is added at different times depending on the meat. And just pork, no beef. You have to cook it for hours, but that’s the point. All the flavours come out and combine more than they would just adding everything together at the end.

  5. Rachel says:

    @Terry
    Could you recommend a recipe like you would do in Minas – I am interested in the differences.

    Also I dont really fancy eating trotters or pigs ears but would definitely use them as a flavouring as I had a bean stew in Italy earlier this year where they were used and it was very tasty!

    Thanks

  6. Terry says:

    My wife doesn’t have a recipe written down but she I think she puts first a couple of cut up pork hocks in the pot and a package of black turtle beans and water to cover. As it’s cooking (like after about an hour maybe) she will add cut up bacon, sausage (we just use what we can find locally, i.e. hot italian sausage) and pork ribs. Cook for another hour or so, stirring occasionally and add some green onion and parsley near the end. She usually serves it with rice, slices of oranges, collard greens (which I don’t like but if you do, roll up the leaves like a cigar, slice thinly, and saute in oil).

  7. Marcelo says:

    Hello Guys! I’m in Australia and It’s been tough to find Beef Jerky here. Do you Know any other similar meat to substitute?
    Thanks a lot!

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